Blocked Attachments

One of the ways that KU protects the mail system and individual mailboxes from malicious software is by blocking attachments that are commonly used to transmit viruses or malicious software.

The KU IT Knowledgebase provides a full listing of the file types currently being blocked, along with the common file extensions for the specific file types.

Below are some of the common questions regarding blocked attachments within the KU email system:

How do I know a file is being blocked?

The KU mailbox that is sending or receiving a blocked attachment receives an email notification that an attachment has been blocked.

A file is being blocked. What do I do?

Option 1: Hawk Drive.
KU Information Technology offers secure file storage, versioning and collaboration through Hawk Drive. Files can be shared with anyone, inside or outside of KU. Hawk Drive offers up to 1GB of file space and through its sharing and ticketing features. Sharing files through Hawk Drive relieves issues pertaining to blocked file types for attachments.

Option 2: Password-protected archive file.
To send or receive an attachment that is being blocked, the sender of the message must first place the file into a password-protected archive file, then attach it to the message. There are a variety of Windows and Macintosh programs that can create these files, including WinZip and StuffIt.

The sender should include instructions in the email telling the recipient the archive type and contents and let the recipient know what the password is to the protected file.

Password-protected archives should NEVER be used to transmit any data that is confidential or protected, because password-protected archives are easy to decode by any determined hacker.

Is it possible to simply replace the file extension with an unblocked file extension?

Renaming the file extension won't work. The scanning software can detect the blocked filetypes, even when the file is renamed.

Why is my archive file being blocked?

Archive files are NOT automatically blocked. The only time an archive file is not delivered is when it contains a file that is of a blocked file type.

If an archive file is blocked, the sender needs to put the archive file into a password protected archive file (an archive within an archive), then send that file to the recipient.

The sender should include instructions in the email telling the recipient the archive type and contents. As the sender, let the recipient know what the password is to the protected file.

Password-protected archives should NEVER be used to transmit any data that is confidential or protected, because password-protected archives are easy to decode by any determined hacker.


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